Dr Hamish Reid, MBChB BSc FFSEM MRCEM MRCS(Ed) DiMM DMCC DipSEM

Hamish is a Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine and Fellow of the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine in the UK. He joins us from Oxford in the UK where he was working in Oxsport, a leading Sport and Musculoskeletal medicine clinic, caring for all ages of patients from children to older adults. Hamish has worked in various elite sport roles including the English Institute of Sport, Southampton Football club, British Athletics and the Rugby Football Union.

With a clinical and academic interest in exercise medicine and supporting population physical activity through healthcare, Hamish has been the design and development lead for a large national initiative in the UK called Moving Medicine (movingmedicine.ac.uk) and led a national feasibility pilot in Oxford to deliver a consultant led physical activity service in a hospital. He talks internationally on developing physical activity services in healthcare systems and leads an education programme on the role of physical activity in the management of longterm conditions. He is committed to helping people self-manage long term medical conditions through active lifestyles and high quality behavioural change management.

Prior to specialising in Sport and Exercise Medicine, Hamish was an emergency medicine doctor and served in the British Army. He has also worked in charitable and voluntary roles in Zambia, Ghana, Senegal, Tanzania and Sumatra and covered various expeditions including Mongolia and Nepal. He teaches on the Nepalese Mountain Medicine Diploma and other expedition and wilderness medicine courses.

Hamish has been active throughout his life and grew up sailing on the Isle of Wight. Since retiring from playing rugby, he has undertaken various sporting challenges including an unsupported pairs row around Great Britain (for which he has a Guinness World Record), swim across the English Channel, doggy paddling the length of the river Thames and tried (unsuccessfully) to break the world’s longest continuous crawling record.